The thrill is gone: Blues legend B.B King dead at 89

For six decades, Riley B. King, the legendary guitarist known as B.B. King contributed immensely to the well recognition and popularity of Blues. The legend passed away on Thursday night May 14 2015 at the age of 89.
The Mississippi native’s reign as “king of the blues” influenced a generation of rock and blues musicians, from Eric Clapton and Stevie Ray Vaughan, to Sheryl Crow and John Mayer.
His life was the subject of the documentary “B.B. King: The Life of Riley,” and the inspiration for The B.B. King Museum and Delta Interpretive Center, which opened in 2008 in Mississippi.
King’s enduring legacy came from his refusal to slow down even after cementing his status as an American music icon.
Even with a long list of honors to his name — Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award, Rock and Roll Hall of Fame induction, Presidential Medal of Freedom — he maintained a relentless touring schedule well into his 80s.
Throughout his career, King evolved with the times to incorporate contemporary trends and influences without straying from his Delta blues roots. Whether he was sharing the stage with U2 on “When Loves Comes to Town” — a scene memorialized in the 1988 concert film, “Rattle and Hum” — or playing in the East Room of the White House with Buddy Guy, Mick Jagger, Jeff Beck and others, King’s single-string guitar notes trilled with an unmistakable vibrato from his hollow-bodied Gibson affectionately known as Lucille.

(Compiled from CNN)